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Asscher

The Asscher shape diamond is equally as alluring and distinctive as the emerald cut but with a square shape and chiselled corners. This means it provides fascinating light displays from every angle.

The facets of the Asscher Cut, which resemble a staircase, draw the eye towards the top of the stone to highlight its clear-cut appearance. It's almost like looking into glacier-pure ice.

Unusual yet elegant, the Asscher shape diamond is sure to make a lasting impression, so take your pick from our stunning range.

History and Origins of Asscher Diamonds

Often labelled as a cut-cornered square step cut, a square emerald cut or an octagonal cut, the Asscher is both charming and captivating in its appearance. Just like the emerald cut, it creates the incredible "Halls of Mirrors" optical illusion.

The Asscher cut diamond has 72 facets, which are larger and wider-set than other shapes with three rows on top and three on the bottom. Because its shape is so similar to a natural diamond crystal, the Asscher has minimal waste during the cutting process, achieving much better value for money.

It's the cut of choice for fashion conscious consumers, especially those with a penchant for vintage chic. Wearers of the Asscher are said to be feminine, special, meticulous and authoritative.

What You Need to Know About Asscher Diamonds


The Asscher cut was created in 1902 by the grandson of Joseph Isaac Asscher, who founded the I.J. Asscher diamond company in Holland 1854. Today it is known as the Royal Asscher Diamond Company.

Although similar to an emerald cut in a square shape, Joseph Asscher III modified the cut's criteria to leverage the beauty found within rough diamonds. These included larger step facets, a higher crown, and smaller table. This means the Asscher has more weight than other cuts while retaining a classic look.

Up until World War II, the Asscher family had a patent on the cut and was the only company that could produce it. But since then it has been more widely produced and enjoyed by many famous names including Elizabeth Taylor, who probably owned the most famous Asscher cut diamond ring featuring the 33.19 Krupp diamond.

A Guide to the Cut, Colour and Clarity of Asscher Diamonds

Cut

Due to its unique faceting pattern, the Asscher cut provides sensational amounts of glimmer as opposed to the traditional sparkle of round diamonds. But similar to other fancy cut diamonds, the GIA does not grade the cut quality of Asscher diamonds.

Colour

Due to its unique faceting pattern, the Asscher cut provides sensational amounts of glimmer as opposed to the traditional sparkle of round diamonds. But similar to other fancy cut diamonds,

Clarity

Asscher cuts do not sparkle in the same way brilliant cut diamonds do, so inclusions are easier to see. If you're interested in a larger stone, consider VVS1 or VVS2 grades for an eye-clean look.

Asscher Diamond Ring Settings

Halo

Due to its unique faceting pattern, the Asscher cut provides sensational amounts of glimmer as opposed to the traditional sparkle of round diamonds. But similar to other fancy cut diamonds, the GIA does not grade the cut quality of Asscher diamonds.

Four prong

With an open four prong setting, plenty of light will be able to enter the stone, thus maximising its flash and fire qualities.

Cathedral

This setting will lift the Asscher stone up even higher, helping the stone to really stand out on diamond solitaire engagement rings.

Channel

This is a good choice for smaller Asscher cut gemstones, especially if they wrap around the band of the ring.

4C Of Diamond

Diamond Color

GIA developed the definitive diamond color scale or chart in the early 1950s, a time when there were a lot of different and subjective terms in the marketplace for describing a diamond’s color:  white, blue white, AAAA, for example.

The GIA scale begins with the letter D, representing colorlessness, and continues with increasing presence of color to the letter Z, representing light yellow, light brown or light gray. The 23 color grades on the GIA Color Scale (or diamond color chart) are subdivided into five subcategories, which are: colorless (D-F); near colorless (G-J); faint (K-M); very light (N-R); and light (S-Z).

Diamond Clarity

Diamond Clarity refers to the inclusions and blimishes.

To understand diamond clarity, we must first understand how diamonds are created. Natural diamonds are the result of carbon exposed to tremendous heat and pressure deep in the earth. This process can result in a variety of internal characteristics called ‘inclusions’ and external characteristics called ‘blemishes.’

Evaluating diamond clarity involves determining the number, size, relief, nature, and position of these characteristics, as well as how these affect the overall appearance of the stone. If you are trying to determine what is the best clarity for a diamond, remember that no diamond is perfectly pure. But the closer it comes to purity, the better its clarity

Diamond Cut

Achieving the best cut for a diamond reflects in the stone’s final beauty and value.

Diamonds are renowned for their ability to transmit light and sparkle so intensely. We often think of a diamond’s cut as shape (round, heart, oval, marquise, pear), but what diamond cut actually does mean how well a diamond’s facets interact with light. Precise artistry and workmanship are required to fashion a stone so its proportions, symmetry and polish deliver the magnificent return of light only possible in a diamond.

Carat Weight

Diamond carat weight measures Diamonds Apparent size.

To put it simply, diamond carat weight measures how much a diamond weighs. 

A metric “carat” is defined as 200 milligrams. Each carat is subdivided into 100 ‘points.’ This allows very precise measurements to the hundredth decimal place. A jeweler may describe the weight of a diamond below one carat by its ‘points’ alone. For instance, the jeweler may refer to a diamond that weighs 0.25 carats as a ‘twenty-five pointer.’ Diamond weights greater than one carat are expressed in carats and decimals. A 1.08 carat stone would be described as ‘one point oh eight carats.’

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