Diamonds Shapes

Diamonds come in many different shapes, each with their own unique qualities. From the soft curves of a cushion cut to the angular points of a princess cut, shape plays an important role in making a diamond uniquely yours.

The most traditional shape is the brilliant round diamond; the choice of most people and the first image that comes to mind when you think about this precious gemstone. However, other cuts should not be ignored or overlooked, as they are all equalling unique and alluring.

Some diamond shapes will mask colour because of how it interacts with light, while others require a high clarity grade to bring out their brilliance. Ultimately though, the diamond shape that you decide upon will come down to personal preference, as well as its jewellery setting.


How Are Diamonds Shaped?

Because diamond is one of the hardest materials known to man, it needs to be cut and shaped with other diamonds using an incredibly specialised process.

It starts by assessing the potential of a rough, freshly-mined diamond in its natural state. Using a combination of computer modelling and an expert's eye, a decision is made on how best to cut and shape the diamond.

The rough diamond is then 'cleaved' into smaller pieces or cut directly with a saw or laser. Either way, once the diamond is of the desired size, the facets of the stone are ground flat against another diamond.

After the facets are complete, the diamond is polished to smooth out any remaining rough parts of the stone. It’s then boiled in a solvent of hydrochloric and sulphuric acids to remove any dust and oil.

Popular Diamond Shapes
ROUND

Used commonly for earrings, pendants and solitaire engagement rings, round remains the most popular diamond shape. Its 58-facet cut, divided among its crown (top), girdle (widest part) and pavilion (base), is calibrated through a precise formula to achieve the maximum in fire and brilliance.

PRINCESS

Used commonly for earrings, pendants and solitaire engagement rings, round remains the most popular diamond shape. Its 58-facet cut, divided among its crown (top), girdle (widest part) and pavilion (base), is calibrated through a precise formula to achieve the maximum in fire and brilliance.

OVAL

Oval-shaped diamonds have a rich history, dating back as early as 1304 with the famous Koh-i-Noor. Featuring a symmetrical and even design, oval diamonds appeal to many small handed women as it elongates the fingers.

CUSHION

A late 19th and early 20th century style antique shape. Cushion-cut diamonds (also known as pillow-cut diamonds) have rounded corners and larger facets to increase their brilliance. However, the larger facets can show inclusions more easily.

PEAR

Resembling a teardrop, the pear shape combines the best of the round and marquise shapes. It effortlessly complements the average sized hand and fingers. It is also ideally suited for pendants and earrings.

EMERALD

This shape is known as a step cut because its broad, flat planes resemble stair steps. Because of this and its large open table, the emerald highlights the clarity of a diamond.

MARQUISE

Named after a mistress of King Louis XV, whose lips it was thought to resemble, this shape creates an illusion that the diamond is larger in size. It is beautiful as a solitaire or when matched with smaller complimentary diamonds.

RADIANT

The elegance of the emerald and the brilliance of the round shape marks this cut. Varying in their degree of rectangularity, radiant-cut diamonds look equally stunning set with either baguette or round side-diamonds.

HEART

This hopelessly romantic and feminine shape is not as popular as you might expect, which makes it even more unique. The extraordinary skill of the cutter determines the beauty of this shape.

ASSCHER

This cut was made popular in the 1920's by the Asscher Diamond Company in Amsterdam, paying homage to the Art Deco movement that was in vogue at the time. An Asscher’s pavilion is cut with rectangular facets in the same style as the emerald.